Difference between revisions of "Sunstone"

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(Added Oregon Sunstone text)
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[[Image:Illusion-sunstone-ben.jpg|left|framed|An example of a rough Illusion or Confetti Sunstone from Africa <br /> Photo courtesy of Ben Pfeiffer]]<br clear="left" />
 
[[Image:Illusion-sunstone-ben.jpg|left|framed|An example of a rough Illusion or Confetti Sunstone from Africa <br /> Photo courtesy of Ben Pfeiffer]]<br clear="left" />
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== Oregon Sunstone ==
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[[Image:Oregon Sunstone 20.15 ct|left|framed|Oregon Sunstone 20.15 ct <br /> Photo courtesy of Jeffrey Hunt]]<br clear="left" />
  
 
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One significant source of sunstone is Oregon, USA where it is the official state gem.  Small mines in Oregon produce a range of material in various colors including peach, green, and red as well as dichroic specimens.
 
One significant source of sunstone is Oregon, USA where it is the official state gem.  Small mines in Oregon produce a range of material in various colors including peach, green, and red as well as dichroic specimens.

Revision as of 13:14, 7 August 2010

Sunstone
Chemical composition Oligoclase feldspar
An example of a rough Illusion or Confetti Sunstone from Africa
Photo courtesy of Ben Pfeiffer

Oregon Sunstone

Oregon Sunstone 20.15 ct
Photo courtesy of Jeffrey Hunt

Sunstone image gallery

One significant source of sunstone is Oregon, USA where it is the official state gem. Small mines in Oregon produce a range of material in various colors including peach, green, and red as well as dichroic specimens.